Life

Trollope’s writing shows a deep understanding of people and life.

  • That which enables the avaricious and the unjust to pass scatheless through the world is not the ignorance of the world as to their sins, but the indifference of the world whether they be sinful or no.

    The Bertrams

  • That feeling of over-due bills, of bills coming due, of accounts overdrawn, of tradesmen unpaid, of general money cares, is very dreadful at first; but it is astonishing how soon men get used to it.

    Framley Parsonage

  • It is sometimes very hard to escape from the meshes of friendship.

    The Claverings

  • It is when things go badly with us here, and for most of us only then, that we think that we can see through the dark clouds into the joys of heaven.

    He Knew He Was Right

  • That feeling of over-due bills, of bills coming due, of accounts overdrawn, of tradesmen unpaid, of general money cares, is very dreadful at first; but it is astonishing how soon men get used to it. A load which would crush a man at first becomes, by habit, not only endurable, but easy and comfortable to the bearer.

    Framley Parsonage

  • For the ordinary purposes of conversation a superficial knowledge of many things goes further than an intimacy with one or two.

    The Turkish Bath

  • The word that is written is a thing capable of permanent life, and lives frequently to the confusion of its parent. A man should make his confessions always by word of mouth if it be possible.

    The Claverings

  • A man when he wishes to use burning words should use them while the words are on fire.

    An Old Man's Love

  • Sit down and write your letter; write it with all the venom in your power; spit out your spleen at the fullest; 'twill do you good ... say all that you can say with all your poisoned eloquence, and gratify yourself by reading it while your temper is still hot. Then put it in your desk; and, as a matter of course, burn it before breakfast the following morning.

    The Bertrams

  • Fortune favours the brave; and the world certainly gives the most credit to those who are able to give an unlimited credit to themselves.

    The Bertrams

  • A man, when he undertakes to advise another, should not be down in the mouth himself.

    The Landleaguers

  • It is very well to have friends to lean upon, but it is not always well to lean upon one's friends.

    Orley Farm

  • Last days are wretched days; and so are last moments wretched moments. It is not the fact that the parting is coming which makes these days and moments so wretched but the feeling that something special is expected from them.

    The Small House at Allington

  • Wise people, when they are in the wrong, always put themselves right by finding fault with the people against whom they have sinned.

    Barchester Towers

  • The dream of youth becomes the doubt of middle life, and then the despair of age.

    The Bertrams

  • The secrets of the world are very marvellous but they are not themselves half so wonderful as the way in which they become known to the world.

    Phineas Redux

  • When things have once gone wrong they cannot be mended without showing the patches.

    The Claverings

  • If dishonesty can live in a gorgeous palace with pictures on all its walls, and gems in all its cupboards, with marble and ivory in all its corners, and can give Apician dinners, and get into Parliament, and deal in millions, then dishonesty is not disgraceful, and the man dishonest after such a fashion is not a low scoundrel.

    The Way We Live Now

  • Her happiness, like that of most of us, was ever in the future,—never reached but always coming.

    The Way We Live Now

  • Words spoken cannot be recalled, and many a man and many a woman who has spoken a word at once regretted, are far too proud to express that regret.

    He Knew He Was Right

  • It seems to me that if a man can so train himself that he may live honestly and die fearlessly, he has done about as much as is necessary.

    Can You Forgive Her?

  • Whatever be the misery to be endured, get it over. The horror of every agony is in its anticipation.

    The Way We Live Now